Valor Temporal del Dinero y Felicidad

Alejandro López-Rousseau, Timothy Ketelaar

Resumen


Una cuestión importante en la literatura sobre el bienestar es cómo ganar y gastar dinero hace feliz a la gente. Algunos estudios han demostrado que la gente es más feliz cuando gana dinero en pagos constantes y gasta dinero en personas significativas. Sin embargo, algunos hallazgos sugieren que la gente con experticia financiera puede tener diferentes preferencias basadas en el valor temporal del dinero. El estudio actual fue diseñado para abordar este asunto preguntando tanto a novatos financieros como a expertos financieros si ganar dinero a tasas decrecientes, constantes o crecientes los haría más felices. Al replicar y, más importante todavía, desambiguar hallazgos anteriores, los resultados sugieren que los novatos financieros son más felices cuando ganan dinero en pagos constantes y gastan dinero en deudas, mientras que los expertos financieros son más felices cuando ganan dinero en pagos decrecientes y gastan dinero en inversiones. Estos hallazgos sugieren que ganar y gastar dinero hace que la gente sea más feliz de diferentes maneras dependiendo de su experticia financiera.


Palabras clave


bienestar, dinero, felicidad, experticia financiera

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Referencias


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DOI: https://doi.org/10.46553/RPSI.17.33.2021.p22-35

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